Frequently Asked Questions

Therapy hasn’t worked for me before, why should it work now?

One of the reasons that therapy sometimes does not work is that there isn’t a good fit between the client and the therapist. For me, one of the most important starting points for change to take place, is that a trusting, solid, comfortable relationship develops between the client and the therapist. As part of the way that I work, I have developed a “safe and comfortable” guarantee.

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Therapy is too expensive, how can I justify it?

I suppose therapy is expensive, however most people spend a long time saving up to go on a really expensive holiday. Perhaps you could use some of the “holiday” savings to go on a journey within. Holidays are important, it is fun and lifelong memories are created, however long term, inner change, doesn’t always come from a holiday. I see therapy as a unique, inner journey that we deserve and it is necessary to prioritise ourselves and make meaningful changes that will have long lasting effects in most areas of our lives.

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When is the right time to start therapy?

The best time to come to therapy is when you are aware that there is a developing problem or growing difficulty in a relationship, rather than a full-blown crisis. Many people wait until they are in an urgent situation before coming to therapy. Either they come to therapy once their relationship with their child is estranged, to let their partner know that the marriage is over, once a parent dies, or when they are feeling suicidal. Dealing with difficult situations and relationships before they become overwhelming and feel out of control is a more gentle process for everyone involved.

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What will happen in the process of therapy?

Therapy is an unknown, unfamiliar process for you. Often difficult thoughts, feelings and behaviour will be addressed. The end result and goal of all therapeutic endeavours is to help you lead a more fulfilling and meaningful life. With this objective in mind, therapy moves at a pace that you feel comfortable with. We deal with issues when you feel safe enough to raise them, and always it is within a safe, caring, trusting therapeutic relationship.

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My partner has given me ultimatum to attend therapy – I am angry and resentful, will therapy still work?

In these situations, the therapist has an important role to play in recognising this, and in helping you set realistic and appropriate goals for yourself. You might have felt pressurized to be in therapy, but once you are here – you get to choose what issues you want to address, how therapy can benefit you, and how much (if anything) you want to share with your partner about a very personal, therapeutic experience. Once again, the “safe and comfortable” guarantee will be in place.

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